Author Topic: NocturnalLogic  (Read 17387 times)

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Offline Joe

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Re: NocturnalLogic
« Reply #45 on: August 12, 2008, 06:06:36 AM »
x86 grammar: To boldly go where no man has ever gone before.
I'd personally do as Joe suggests

You might be right about that, Joe.


Offline rabbit

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Re: NocturnalLogic
« Reply #46 on: August 12, 2008, 07:34:55 AM »
Wrong. It's a simile. You can't put the word like there; its grammatically invalid.
First,
Quote
A simile is literary device that uses the words "like" or "as" to compare two ideas. [...] a simile allows the two ideas to remain distinct in spite of their similarities

Second, He's comparing two forms of the same thing, which means it's not even a simile, it's a comparison, in which case "like" is still grammatically correct.

Offline iago

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Re: NocturnalLogic
« Reply #47 on: August 12, 2008, 08:30:23 AM »
wtf is all this english shit dont we have an off topic forum
Only by name...

Offline Camel

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Re: NocturnalLogic
« Reply #48 on: August 13, 2008, 03:37:39 AM »
Linux users need to give up the animosity and save their hatred

The emboldened words split "save" from "to", hence split infinitive. (Though you may more generally be addressing parallel construction.)

I never thought of it that way, but I don't think that's correct anyways because 'give' hijacks the 'to;' it's certainly debatable.

Analogously, do you think people should write, "I will go outside and I will play basketball" versus "I will go outside and play basketball"? The former sentence has a slightly different meaning, after all.
You already answered the question, but I'll add that the former is also run-on sentence.

<Camel> i said what what
<Blaze> in the butt
<Camel> you want to do it in my butt?
<Blaze> in my butt
<Camel> let's do it in the butt
<Blaze> Okay!

Offline Camel

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Re: NocturnalLogic
« Reply #49 on: August 13, 2008, 03:52:15 AM »
Wrong. It's a simile. You can't put the word like there; its grammatically invalid.
First,
Quote
A simile is literary device that uses the words "like" or "as" to compare two ideas. [...] a simile allows the two ideas to remain distinct in spite of their similarities

Second, He's comparing two forms of the same thing, which means it's not even a simile, it's a comparison, in which case "like" is still grammatically correct.

Your conclusions is erroneous; the definition you quoted agrees with my use of the word. The sentence compares the ideas of 'writing' and 'thinking,' which are similar yet distinct.

Even if you argue with that, we've already established that grammar is not pedantic, so your point is irrelevant in that regard.

Finally, the grammatical error isn't even conditional on it being a simile. The word 'like' can only be followed by a noun, where as the word 'as' can only be followed by an adverbial phrase. It may have been confusing that I even mentioned it's a simile, but the rule (see link below) usually comes with the word, since they're so closely linked.

http://trc.ucdavis.edu/bajaffee/SAS90B/Course%20Content/Grammar%20Syllabus/Like%20vs%20As.htm


QED
« Last Edit: August 13, 2008, 03:54:12 AM by Camel »

<Camel> i said what what
<Blaze> in the butt
<Camel> you want to do it in my butt?
<Blaze> in my butt
<Camel> let's do it in the butt
<Blaze> Okay!

Offline Joe

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Re: NocturnalLogic
« Reply #50 on: August 13, 2008, 08:02:41 AM »
Camel smells like a camel.

I just followed "like" with an article, not a noun.
I'd personally do as Joe suggests

You might be right about that, Joe.


Offline Newby

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Re: NocturnalLogic
« Reply #51 on: August 13, 2008, 01:09:34 PM »
Finally, the grammatical error isn't even conditional on it being a simile. The word 'like' can only be followed by a noun, where as the word 'as' can only be followed by an adverbial phrase. It may have been confusing that I even mentioned it's a simile, but the rule (see link below) usually comes with the word, since they're so closely linked.

http://trc.ucdavis.edu/bajaffee/SAS90B/Course%20Content/Grammar%20Syllabus/Like%20vs%20As.htm
QED

Only correct because you linked to my school. :)
- Newby
http://www.x86labs.org

Quote
[17:32:45] * xar sets mode: -oooooooooo algorithm ban chris cipher newby stdio TehUser tnarongi|away vursed warz
[17:32:54] * xar sets mode: +o newby
[17:32:58] <xar> new rule
[17:33:02] <xar> me and newby rule all

I'd bet that you're currently bloated like a water ballon on a hot summer's day.

That analogy doesn't even make sense.  Why would a water balloon be especially bloated on a hot summer's day? For your sake, I hope there wasn't too much logic testing on your LSAT. 

Offline Camel

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Re: NocturnalLogic
« Reply #52 on: August 13, 2008, 03:11:11 PM »
Only correct because you linked to my school. :)

Your school uses IIS; fail.

<Camel> i said what what
<Blaze> in the butt
<Camel> you want to do it in my butt?
<Blaze> in my butt
<Camel> let's do it in the butt
<Blaze> Okay!

Offline Newby

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Re: NocturnalLogic
« Reply #53 on: August 13, 2008, 03:15:30 PM »
And ancient Solaris for their shells!
- Newby
http://www.x86labs.org

Quote
[17:32:45] * xar sets mode: -oooooooooo algorithm ban chris cipher newby stdio TehUser tnarongi|away vursed warz
[17:32:54] * xar sets mode: +o newby
[17:32:58] <xar> new rule
[17:33:02] <xar> me and newby rule all

I'd bet that you're currently bloated like a water ballon on a hot summer's day.

That analogy doesn't even make sense.  Why would a water balloon be especially bloated on a hot summer's day? For your sake, I hope there wasn't too much logic testing on your LSAT.