Author Topic: Novice Programmer  (Read 32292 times)

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Offline GameSnake

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Re: Novice Programmer
« Reply #30 on: December 29, 2004, 06:42:04 am »
Learn Python first!

Offline Quik

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Re: Novice Programmer
« Reply #31 on: December 29, 2004, 02:21:07 pm »
Kinda posting in a dead topic?
Quote
[20:21:13] xar: i was just thinking about the time iago came over here and we made this huge bomb and light up the sky for 6 min
[20:21:15] xar: that was funny

Offline iago

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Re: Novice Programmer
« Reply #32 on: December 29, 2004, 05:18:23 pm »
Useful advice is useful advice, no matter how old the topic is.

I tend to go by the rule of thumb, "Don't post in old topics unless you have something useful to add"

AntiVirus

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Re: Novice Programmer
« Reply #33 on: January 06, 2005, 01:02:47 am »
Troop, if you want to learn VB then you will have to buy a book.  No one will teach you an entire language over the internet, that is just sucide.  If you need help finding books, I will be glad to help, but that's just all your going to be getting told.

Offline wires

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Re: Novice Programmer
« Reply #34 on: January 06, 2005, 07:06:34 pm »
Or, you could just learn the language yourself.  I taught most of the stuff I know myself then bought a book later. :/

Offline iago

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Re: Novice Programmer
« Reply #35 on: January 06, 2005, 07:36:19 pm »
It depends on the language.  It's easy to learn a language like VB or Pascal on the fly, they're designed to be easy (and useless..).  To learn a real language, I recommend a book.

I've read good things about "Thinking in Java" by Bruce Eckel.

Offline StaiN

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Re: Novice Programmer
« Reply #36 on: April 04, 2005, 03:41:56 am »
Indeed Books are the way to go. Tutorials are good aswell but I find myself getting drawn away from Tutorials cuz theres other things I could be doing on the Computer ;) Pr0n jk.. Like IM's and stuff. So BOOKS DO IT.

Offline Joe

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Re: Novice Programmer
« Reply #37 on: April 04, 2005, 06:37:05 pm »
Microsoft VisualBasic 3.0 Language Reference, which came with VB3, was my bible durring my learning process, but theres obviously a newer version out there somewhere. It was sufficient to teach myself VB6, but sometimes I had to improvise because of changes. Either way, I survived.

Also, I have MS VB3 Programmers Guide, but have yet to read it. I suppose its supposed to teach you coding habits. If so, avoid it :P
EDIT: Programmers Guide teaches you how to use the IDE. That was a 3 second crash course for me.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2005, 06:39:10 pm by Joe[x86] »
I'd personally do as Joe suggests

You might be right about that, Joe.


Offline GameSnake

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Re: Novice Programmer
« Reply #38 on: April 06, 2005, 11:43:01 pm »
Well let's see, I learned almost all I know about Python and Lisp from the provided support and provided links to support from the authors website's,  but then again, as pointed out by iago, easier languages are easier to learn on the fly.