Author Topic: GRE  (Read 2664 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline dark_drake

  • Mufasa was 10x the lion Simba was.
  • x86
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2447
  • Dun dun dun
    • View Profile
GRE
« on: July 28, 2009, 07:54:02 PM »
So, I've finally decided to shoot for graduate school. Does anyone have any tips for the GRE? Any advice? Thanks in advance!
errr... something like that...

Offline Chavo

  • x86
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2229
  • no u
    • View Profile
    • Chavoland
Re: GRE
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2009, 08:18:48 PM »
I heard it's harder than the GED

Offline deadly7

  • 42
  • x86
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6496
    • View Profile
Re: GRE
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2009, 01:56:50 AM »
So, I've finally decided to shoot for graduate school. Does anyone have any tips for the GRE? Any advice? Thanks in advance!
Answer the questions correctly.


In all seriousness, since I actually know you pretty well, I don't think there's any advice people here could really give you that you don't already incorporate into your study tactics. When are you taking it?
[17:42:21.609] <Ergot> Kutsuju you're girlfrieds pussy must be a 403 error for you
 [17:42:25.585] <Ergot> FORBIDDEN

on IRC playing T&T++
<iago> He is unarmed
<Hitmen> he has no arms?!

on AIM with a drunk mythix:
(00:50:05) Mythix: Deadly
(00:50:11) Mythix: I'm going to fuck that red dot out of your head.
(00:50:15) Mythix: with my nine

Offline Rule

  • x86
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1588
    • View Profile
Re: GRE
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2009, 12:50:57 PM »
The math section is very easy, but because of this, people in physics, math, CS, etc., are expected to get 800/800 or pretty close to it (e.g. 750+), for most good graduate schools.  To me, it seems mostly like an exercise in working quickly and avoiding careless mistakes.

The verbal is difficult.  Time is a major issue.  If you can learn to work quickly, that will help a lot.  Memorizing some vocabulary lists might be helpful also.  If you're not going into the arts, the verbal score isn't that important though (as far as I know).  If you can get 600+/800, you should be fine, from what I know.  650 would be a safe score (probably).

These are just my rough impressions.  I didn't carefully research what schools wanted.

« Last Edit: July 29, 2009, 12:53:15 PM by Rule »

Offline Newby

  • x86
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10877
  • Thrash!
    • View Profile
Re: GRE
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2009, 01:20:47 PM »
I've also heard some schools say that if your GPA is above a certain score, they don't even care if you take the GRE, but I doubt those are good schools.

Seeing as how I am very ignorant to how the GRE works... is this a must for most graduate programs?
- Newby
http://www.x86labs.org

Quote
[17:32:45] * xar sets mode: -oooooooooo algorithm ban chris cipher newby stdio TehUser tnarongi|away vursed warz
[17:32:54] * xar sets mode: +o newby
[17:32:58] <xar> new rule
[17:33:02] <xar> me and newby rule all

I'd bet that you're currently bloated like a water ballon on a hot summer's day.

That analogy doesn't even make sense.  Why would a water balloon be especially bloated on a hot summer's day? For your sake, I hope there wasn't too much logic testing on your LSAT. 

Offline dark_drake

  • Mufasa was 10x the lion Simba was.
  • x86
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2447
  • Dun dun dun
    • View Profile
Re: GRE
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2009, 08:09:34 PM »
The math section is very easy, but because of this, people in physics, math, CS, etc., are expected to get 800/800 or pretty close to it (e.g. 750+), for most good graduate schools.  To me, it seems mostly like an exercise in working quickly and avoiding careless mistakes.

The verbal is difficult.  Time is a major issue.  If you can learn to work quickly, that will help a lot.  Memorizing some vocabulary lists might be helpful also.  If you're not going into the arts, the verbal score isn't that important though (as far as I know).  If you can get 600+/800, you should be fine, from what I know.  650 would be a safe score (probably).

These are just my rough impressions.  I didn't carefully research what schools wanted.
Thanks! I'm going into chemical engineering (or chemistry or applied math). I'm working on the vocabularly now. I need to take a few practice exams to find out where I sit. Do you happen to know anything about the writing portion of the GRE? It was news to me because the grad schools I was looking at didn't mention a requisite score on that part, which to me meant they don't weigh it. That or it's just expected all candidates receive a score demonstrating proficiency.
errr... something like that...

Offline Rule

  • x86
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1588
    • View Profile
Re: GRE
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2009, 08:29:27 PM »
I've also heard some schools say that if your GPA is above a certain score, they don't even care if you take the GRE, but I doubt those are good schools.

Seeing as how I am very ignorant to how the GRE works... is this a must for most graduate programs?

It depends... there isn't really a "rule" for these things.  The GRE, especially the general, is not useful in the very most selective programs.  It just can't test a lot, and what it does test is somewhat irrelevant. (For example, the level of math is well below what most science students are used to, and whether someone can do these questions a few seconds faster, and with less chance of making a careless mistake, is not a predictor of success in graduate school).  I think most of the best schools are aware of this, and some don't even require the GRE for certain programs.  (e.g. I believe MIT doesn't for some quite selective programs).  I see it as more of filter in the cases where there is a huge volume of applications.

However, in general, if you are applying to a Math (e.g. dept of mathematics) or Physics graduate program in the US, you will likely need both the GRE general and the GRE subject test.  (Also, the GRE subject test in Math, unlike the general, is actually quite hard).  And usually, if you are applying to US schools for Computer Science, you will need the GRE general. I'm not sure about engineering.  I would guess that it varies a lot from school to school.  IF the program you're interested in requires the GRE, and it is known as a selective school, I would say 750/800 on Math, 600 on verbal, and 5/6 on writing, minimum. 

Also, studying/practice can make a profound difference on this test.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2009, 08:48:41 PM by Rule »

Offline Rule

  • x86
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1588
    • View Profile
Re: GRE
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2009, 08:35:37 PM »
The math section is very easy, but because of this, people in physics, math, CS, etc., are expected to get 800/800 or pretty close to it (e.g. 750+), for most good graduate schools.  To me, it seems mostly like an exercise in working quickly and avoiding careless mistakes.

The verbal is difficult.  Time is a major issue.  If you can learn to work quickly, that will help a lot.  Memorizing some vocabulary lists might be helpful also.  If you're not going into the arts, the verbal score isn't that important though (as far as I know).  If you can get 600+/800, you should be fine, from what I know.  650 would be a safe score (probably).

These are just my rough impressions.  I didn't carefully research what schools wanted.
Thanks! I'm going into chemical engineering (or chemistry or applied math). I'm working on the vocabularly now. I need to take a few practice exams to find out where I sit. Do you happen to know anything about the writing portion of the GRE? It was news to me because the grad schools I was looking at didn't mention a requisite score on that part, which to me meant they don't weigh it. That or it's just expected all candidates receive a score demonstrating proficiency.

I think the writing is mostly to see if you are fluent with English.  If you don't make grammatical mistakes, you use connectives, and you know the basic "canned" quick essay style, and you can write a decent amount in a short time, you should be able to get a 5/6.  It's probably worth practicing a couple essays for speed, and reading about their expectations. 

I don't know how important this is, but you probably don't want to get less than a 5/6 on the writing.  I think I have seen some cut-offs for scores < 5.

Disclaimer: All of my advice in this thread is based on recollection and rumour.  I would definitely check out some of the reqs for the specific programs you're interested in.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2009, 08:44:44 PM by Rule »

Offline MyndFyre

  • Boticulator Extraordinaire
  • x86
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4550
  • The wait is over.
    • View Profile
    • JinxBot :: the evolution in boticulation
Re: GRE
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2009, 03:22:13 AM »
The math section is very easy, but because of this, people in physics, math, CS, etc., are expected to get 800/800 or pretty close to it (e.g. 750+), for most good graduate schools.  To me, it seems mostly like an exercise in working quickly and avoiding careless mistakes.

The verbal is difficult.  Time is a major issue.  If you can learn to work quickly, that will help a lot.  Memorizing some vocabulary lists might be helpful also.  If you're not going into the arts, the verbal score isn't that important though (as far as I know).  If you can get 600+/800, you should be fine, from what I know.  650 would be a safe score (probably).

These are just my rough impressions.  I didn't carefully research what schools wanted.
That was my experience.  I got about a 580 on the verbal section and a 780 for the math section, and was accepted into a software engineering program in spite of the fact that my undergraduate degrees were in political science and psychology.... :)
I have a programming folder, and I have nothing of value there

Running with Code has a new home!

Our species really annoys me.